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Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



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Everardus Bogardus

BOGARDUS, Everardus, clergyman, born in Holland; drowned in Bristol channel, 27 September 1647. He came to New Amsterdam in 1633, and was the second minister in the colony. He publicly accused Governor Van Twiller, whom he had accompanied from Holland, of real-administration, and in consequence was himself charged with unbecoming conduct, and was about to depart for Holland in order to defend himself, but was detained by Governor Kieft. In 1642 a new Church was built for him. The following year he warned Governor Kieft against making war upon the Indians, and in 1645 denounced him for drunkenness and rapacity. Kieft brought the clergyman to trial, but the dispute was compromised. When Kieft returned to Holland, after the arrival of Stuyvesant in 1647, Bogardus sailed in the same vessel, to answer charges brought against him, before the classis in Amsterdam. The vessel entered Bristol channel by a mistake, and struck upon a rock, going down with eighty persons, among them Bogardus and Kieft. *His wife, Annetje Jansen, corrupted into Anneke Jans, born in Holland about 1600; died in the village of Beverwyck, New York, 19 March 1663. She first came to America in 1630, with her first husband, Roelof Jansen, of Waterland, who had been sent out by Patroon Van Rensselaer as assistant steward at Albany. They afterward removed to New Amsterdam, among the earliest Dutch settlers. Here, in 1636, they obtained from Governor Wouter Van Twiller a grant of sixty-two acres of land, the present boundaries of which are the North river, Christopher street, Bedford street, West Houston street, Sullivan street, Canal street, West Broadway, Barclay street, Broadway, and Fulton street, around to the River again. Shortly afterward Jansen died, leaving Anneke with four children. In 1638 she married Everardus Bogardus. After the death of Dominie Bogardus, Anneke, again a widow, with four additional children, continued to reside in the City, and in 1654 she obtained from Governor Stuyvesant a patent in her own name of the farm above mentioned. In her will she named as her sole heirs Sarah Roelofson, Katrina Roelofson, Jannettys and Rachel Hartgers (two children of her deceased daughter Frytie), and John Roelofson, her children by her first husband, and William, Cornelius, Jonas, and Peter Bogardus, children of the second marriage. On 27 August 1664, the grant of land was confirmed by the English government, as may be found recorded in the office of the secretary of state at Albany in the "Patent Book," pp. 28-30. In 1670 part of the land, a salt meadow north of Canal street, was sold at public auction; but the sale was never carried out, on account of sortie alleged flaw in the title. In 1671 five of the heirs conveyed the whole farm (or bouwery) to Colonel Francis Lovelace, then governor of the province of New York. But one of the sons, Cornelius, did not join in this conveyance, and therefore his heirs have always claimed that they have a right to their share of the property. In 1705 the estate, then known as the "King's Farm," was leased or granted by the colonial authorities under Queen Anne to Trinity Church; and, in spite of numerous contests, that corporation has continued to enjoy all the benefits and revenues of the vast property to this day. Nicholas Brower, one of the heirs, brought a suit in ejectment in 1750, claiming that the title was not in Queen Anne. He was non-suited by default, renewed his suit in 1760, and was again beaten. In 1807 Colonel Malcolm, who had married an heir, brought an unsuccessful suit in the New York Supreme Court, to recover a part of the property. In 1830 three other heirs had a similar experience. Chancellor Walworth in 1834 dismissed a suit brought by Jonas Humbert. In 1847 Cornelius Brower brought nine suits, all of which were dismissed. In these Vice Chancellor Sanford, after examining every fact on both sides, decided that, waiving all other points, the Church had acquired a perfectly valid title by undisputed possession longer than the limitation at which title might be gained by possession in 1705, when the land came to the Church. The accompanying view represents New York at that time.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

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