Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum
   You are in: Museum of History >> Hall of North and South Americans >> Andrew Oliver

Dad, why are you a Republican?

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889 and 1999. Virtualology.com warns that these 19th Century biographies contain errors and bias. We rely on volunteers to edit the historic biographies on a continual basis. If you would like to edit this biography please submit a rewritten biography in text form . If acceptable, the new biography will be published above the 19th Century Appleton's Cyclopedia Biography citing the volunteer editor

 



Virtual American Biographies

Over 30,000 personalities with thousands of 19th Century illustrations, signatures, and exceptional life stories. Virtualology.com welcomes editing and additions to the biographies. To become this site's editor or a contributor Click Here or e-mail Virtualology here.



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 





Click on an image to view full-sized

Andrew Oliver

OLIVER, Andrew, lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, born in Boston, Massachusetts, 28 March, 1706; died there, 3 March, 1774. His father, Daniel, a member of the council, was a son of Peter, an eminent merchant, and grandson of Thomas, an elder of the church, who arrived in Boston in 1631. The son was graduated at Harvard in 1724. He was chosen a member of the general court, and afterward of the council. In 1748 he was sent with his brother-in-law, Governor Thomas Hutchinson, as a commissioner to the Albany congress that met to conclude peace with the heads of the Six Nations and arrange a rectification of the frontier. In 1756 he was appointed secretary of the province. When the British parliament passed the stamp-act he made himself odious to the patriotic party by accepting the office of distributor of stamps. He was re-elected a councillor by a bare majority On 14 August, 1765, he was hanged in effigy between figures of Lord Bute and George Grenville, on the large elm called the "liberty tree." In the evening the multitude, with cries of "Liberty, property, and no stamps!" demolished the structure that was building for a stamp office. His life was in danger, and the next morning he signed a public pledge that he would not act as stamp-officer. A few months later there was a rumor that he intended to enforce the stamp-act, and on the day of the opening of parliament the Sons of Liberty compelled him to march to the tree and there renew his promise in a speech, and take oath before a justice of the peace, Richard Dana, that he would never, directly or indirectly, take measures for the collection of the stamp duty. In 1770 he was appointed lieutenant-governor, His letters, with those of Hutchinson and others, recommending the despatch of troops to this country, and the criminal prosecution of Samuel Adams and other patriots, were shown to Benjamin Franklin (q. v.) in England, as expressions from Americans of weight and station. Party feeling ran so high at, the time of his death that Hutchinson says" "A large mob attended upon his interment anal hurrahed at the entombing of his body, and that night there was an exhibition at a public window of a coffin, and insignia of infamy."--His brother, Peter, jurist, born in Boston, Massachusetts, 26 March, 1713" died in Birmingham, England, 13 October, 1791, was graduated at Harvard in 1730. He filled various offices in Plymouth county while residing on his estate in Middleborough. Although he was not a lawyer by profession, he was made a justice of the supreme court on 14 September, 1756, and in 1771 became chief justice. He was also one of the mandamus councillors. Oliver was the only judge that refused, in March, 1774, to accept the pay that had been voted by the legislature in lieu of a fixed salary of £400 from the crown. I[e was consequently impeached by the house, and suspended from his functions pending the issue of the trial. He attempted to hold court under the protection of the military, but the jurors refused to serve, and gave as their reasons that the chief justice stood impeached, and that three of the judges had accepted seats in the unconstitutional new council. He openly sided with the royalists, defending their views with dialectic skill in a paper called the "Censor." When the British troops evacuated Boston he departed with them, and afterward went to England, where he received a pension from the treasury. He was a writer of talent, both in prose and verse, and fond of antiquarian studies. When he left this country he took with him a copy of the manuscript history of William Hubbard, and records and papers that he had collected relating to the settlement of Plymouth colony. The University of Oxford gave him the degree of LL.D. A poem in English blank verse, the twenty-ninth in "Pietas et Gratulatio" (Boston. 1761), is ascribed to him or to Thomas Oliver. He published a "Speech on the Death of Isaac Lathrop" (Boston, 1750))" " Poem on the Death of Secretary Willard" (1757)" and "Scriptural Lexicon" (Birmingham, 1784-'5).--Andrew's son, Andrew, jurist, born in Boston, Massachusetts, 13 November, 1731" died in Salem, Massachusetts, in the beginning of December, 1799, was graduated at Harvard in 1749, and devoted himself to scientific and literary studies. He represented Salem in the general court in 1766, and before the Revolution was judge of the Essex county court of common pleas. He was the only one of those members of the family that adhered to the royalist cause to remain in the country after the war of independence. He was one of the founders of the American academy of arts and sciences, and a member of the American philosophical society, to the transactions of which he contributed papers on" Lightning," "Thunder-Storms," and "Water-Spouts," and an account of a " Disease Among the Indians" (1764). He published also an "Essay on Comets," in which he maintained that they were habitable worlds (Salem, 1772).--Another son, William Sandford, born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1748; died in St. John, New Brunswick, in 1813, went with the British army to Halifax in 1776, settled at Parr Town (now St. John), was appointed in 1785 the first sheriff of St. John, and held that office till 1792, and for the second time from 1797 till his death, at which time he was also treasurer of the county.--Peter's son, Peter, physician, born in Middleborough, Massachusetts, in 1741; died in Shrewsbury, England, 30 July, 1822, was graduated at Harvard in 1761. He signed the address to General Gage, and was banished in 1778. In 1814 the Massachusetts historical society requested permission to transcribe from his father's perfect manuscript copy of Hubbard's "History of New England" the portions missing in the American manuscript, but he refused, and the work was published in a mutilated form (Boston, 1815). (See HUBBARD, THOMAS.) His wife was Sallie, the eldest daughter of Governor Thomas Hutchinson.--The second Andrew's grandson, Daniel, born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 9 September, 1787; died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1 June, 1842, was the son of Reverend Thomas Fitch Oliver. He was graduated at Harvard in 1806, and at the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1810. He practised for many years at Salem, Massachusetts, lectured on chemistry at Dartmouth in 1815-'6, and in 1820 removed to Hanover, New Hampshire, having been appointed professor of the theory and practice of medicine, and of materia medica and therapeutics. In 1827-'8 he lectured on the theory and practice of medicine at Bowdoin. In 1828 he took the chair also of intellectual philosophy at Dartmouth. He resigned his professorships in that college in 1837, and in 1841-'2 was a professor in the medical college at Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Oliver was a man of varied erudition, familiar with French and German, as well as the classical languages. He received the degree of LL.D. from Hobart in 1838. His only important publication was "First Lines of Physiology" (Boston, 1835).--Daniel's brother, Benjamin Lynde, author, born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, in 1788; died in 1843, was a lawyer and was also a noted chess-player. His works are "Hints on the Pursuit of Happiness" (Boston, 1818); "The Rights of an American Citizen" (1832); "Law Summary" (2d ed., Hallowell, 1813); "Practical Conveyancing." edited by Peter Oliver (1838; 4th ed. 1845); "Forms of Practice, or American Precedents in Personal and Real Actions" (1841 ; 4th ed., Portland, 1874) ; and "Forms in Chancery, Admiralty, and Common Law" (1842).--Daniel's son, Fitch Edward, physician, born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, 25 November, 1819, was graduated at Dartmouth in 1839, and studied medicine with his father, with Dr. George C. Shattuck, and at Harvard, where he received his M.D. in 1843. He established himself in practice in Boston. In 1860 he assumed the editorship of the Boston " Medical and Surgical Journal." Inheriting from his father a taste for music, he has published some musical works, he was one of the translators of Chomel's "Treatise on General Pathology" (Boston, 1848), and published the "Lynde Diaries" (1880).--Another son, Peter, author, born in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1822" died at sea in 1855, was educated as a lawyer, practised in Suffolk county, Massachusetts, and edited his uncle's "Practical Conveyancing." He was baptized William Pynchon Oliver, but changed this name for the alias Peter when he reached manhood. He published articles in the New York " Church Review." Dying while on a voyage for his health, he left an important work entitled "The Puritan Commonwealth" an Historical Review of the Puritan Government in Massachusetts, in its Civil and Ecclesiastical Relations, from its Rise to the Abrogation of the First Charter" together with some General Reflections on the English Colonial Policy and on the Character of Puritanism," in which, with great learning and literary skill, he presented all the unfavorable aspects of the Puritan character, and impugned the motives and principles, and criticised the acts and policy of the founders of New England. The book was brought out by his brother, Pitch Edward (Boston, 1856), and elicited animated replies from Reverend George E. Ellis, J. Wingate Thornton, and others.--Another son, Andrew, clergyman, born in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1824, was graduated at Harvard in 1842. He studied theology, took orders in the Protestant Episcopal church, and was professor of Greek and Hebrew in St. Stephen's college, Annandale, New York, from 1864 till 1873, when he was called to the chair of biblical learning in the General theological seminary, New York city. He received the degree of D. D. from Hobart in 1868, and from St. Stephen's in 1876. Dr. Oliver has published a translation of the " Syriac Psalter" (Boston, 1861).

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

Start your search on Andrew Oliver.


 

 

 



Unauthorized Site: This site and its contents are not affiliated, connected, associated with or authorized by the individual, family, friends, or trademarked entities utilizing any part or the subject's entire name. Any official or affiliated sites that are related to this subject will be hyper linked below upon submission and Evisum, Inc. review.

Copyright© 2000 by Evisum Inc.TM. All rights reserved.
Evisum Inc.TM Privacy Policy

Search:

About Us

 

 

Image Use

In this powerful, historic work, Stanley Yavneh Klos unfolds the complex 15-year U.S. Founding period revealing, for the first time, four distinctly different United American Republics.  This is history on a splendid scale -- a book about the not quite unified American Colonies and States that would eventually form a fourth republic, with only 11 states, the United States of America: We The People Click Here

 

Childhood & Family

Click Here

 

Historic Documents

Articles of Association

Articles of Confederation 1775

Articles of Confederation

Article the First

Coin Act

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

Emancipation Proclamation

Gettysburg Address

Monroe Doctrine

Northwest Ordinance

No Taxation Without Representation

Thanksgiving Proclamations

Mayflower Compact

Treaty of Paris 1763

Treaty of Paris 1783

Treaty of Versailles

United Nations Charter

United States In Congress Assembled

US Bill of Rights

United States Constitution

US Continental Congress

US Constitution of 1777

US Constitution of 1787

Virginia Declaration of Rights

 

Historic Events

Battle of New Orleans

Battle of Yorktown

Cabinet Room

Civil Rights Movement

Federalist Papers

Fort Duquesne

Fort Necessity

Fort Pitt

French and Indian War

Jumonville Glen

Manhattan Project

Stamp Act Congress

Underground Railroad

US Hospitality

US Presidency

Vietnam War

War of 1812

West Virginia Statehood

Woman Suffrage

World War I

World War II

 

Is it Real?



Declaration of
Independence

Digital Authentication
Click Here

 

America’s Four Republics
The More or Less United States

 
Continental Congress
U.C. Presidents

Peyton Randolph

Henry Middleton

Peyton Randolph

John Hancock

  

Continental Congress
U.S. Presidents

John Hancock

Henry Laurens

John Jay

Samuel Huntington

  

Constitution of 1777
U.S. Presidents

Samuel Huntington

Samuel Johnston
Elected but declined the office

Thomas McKean

John Hanson

Elias Boudinot

Thomas Mifflin

Richard Henry Lee

John Hancock
[
Chairman David Ramsay]

Nathaniel Gorham

Arthur St. Clair

Cyrus Griffin

  

Constitution of 1787
U.S. Presidents

George Washington 

John Adams
Federalist Party


Thomas Jefferson
Republican* Party

James Madison 
Republican* Party

James Monroe
Republican* Party

John Quincy Adams
Republican* Party
Whig Party

Andrew Jackson
Republican* Party
Democratic Party


Martin Van Buren
Democratic Party

William H. Harrison
Whig Party

John Tyler
Whig Party

James K. Polk
Democratic Party

David Atchison**
Democratic Party

Zachary Taylor
Whig Party

Millard Fillmore
Whig Party

Franklin Pierce
Democratic Party

James Buchanan
Democratic Party


Abraham Lincoln 
Republican Party

Jefferson Davis***
Democratic Party

Andrew Johnson
Republican Party

Ulysses S. Grant 
Republican Party

Rutherford B. Hayes
Republican Party

James A. Garfield
Republican Party

Chester Arthur 
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland
Democratic Party

Benjamin Harrison
Republican Party

Grover Cleveland 
Democratic Party

William McKinley
Republican Party

Theodore Roosevelt
Republican Party

William H. Taft 
Republican Party

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic Party

Warren G. Harding 
Republican Party

Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party

Herbert C. Hoover
Republican Party

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Democratic Party

Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican Party

John F. Kennedy
Democratic Party

Lyndon B. Johnson 
Democratic Party 

Richard M. Nixon 
Republican Party

Gerald R. Ford 
Republican Party

James Earl Carter, Jr. 
Democratic Party

Ronald Wilson Reagan 
Republican Party

George H. W. Bush
Republican Party 

William Jefferson Clinton
Democratic Party

George W. Bush 
Republican Party

Barack H. Obama
Democratic Party

Please Visit

Forgotten Founders
Norwich, CT

Annapolis Continental
Congress Society


U.S. Presidency
& Hospitality

© Stan Klos

 

 

 

 


Virtual Museum of Art | Virtual Museum of History | Virtual Public Library | Virtual Science Center | Virtual Museum of Natural History | Virtual War Museum